Unisys Security Index

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  • Survey shows public trust in government protection of digital identity data

    Date: 28/05/2013
    A new survey has shown a significantly higher level of trust in government to handle the public's digital identity data - which is part of the planned UK Online Identity Scheme. The figures show that a high level of support is present for the scheme - 91% support it. However, only 9% would put their trust in private companies to manage identity credentials. This is in contrast to the 61% that said they'd trust the government to handle their data. “As the national digital identity scheme continues to progress, the government needs to take note of consumer opinions. The findings suggest that the Government should look more closely at the Identity Assurance model and take note of consumer preferences for a Government owned authentication provider, potentially the Passport Service” says Neil Fisher, VP Global Security Solutions, Unisys, which conducted the survey. The report also showed the biggest swing in consumer security confidence since the annual survey began in 2007. “While we regularly see reports of phishing, Trojan virus or spam attacks in the media, it’s important to note that by taking certain precautions – including those recommended by the Government’s Office for Cyber Security and Information Assurance – the general public can reduce their online vulnerability," adds Fisher. About the Index The Unisys Security Index is an annual global study. It surveys over 11,000 people, 968 of which were from the UK. More information on the study can be found on the Unisys Security Index website.
  • Airport Security: 90% Would Support Tougher Checks At UK Borders

    Date: 05/05/2012
    Almost 90% of people would support increased security checks at borders, airports and transport hubs, according to a survey. While 89% would back more stringent checks, 64% said such measures were vital ahead of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee celebrations and the London Olympics. In addition, 77% would support the installation of body scanners and 75% would back biometric checks such as fingerprinting, the survey by information technology company Unisys found. The survey of more than 1,000 UK adults was conducted in February - before the recent problems of long immigration queues at Heathrow Airport. The poll also revealed that 79% would like to see enhancements in the way information is shared between governments and security services to ensure public safety during this summer.    
  • Brits Support Social Media Shutdown During Civil Unrest [STUDY]

    Date: 09/11/2011
    The majority of British people support shutting down social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter during times of civil unrest, a new study reveals. The polling follows Prime Minister David Cameron’s August statement that the government would consider temporarily blocking social media to prevent protesters from organizing. Cameron’s assertion led many to discuss freedom of speech and the right to organize. Online security firm Unisys polled 973 British adults about whether they agreed with Cameron. Seventy percent “completely agree” or “agree somewhat” that social networking sites should be shut down to prevent coordinated criminal activity, Forbes reports.  
  • U.K. Citizens Support Social Media Shutdown During Civil Disorder

    Date: 09/11/2011
    As riots erupted in city centers across Britain in August there was a widespread belief that they were being spread and sometimes co-ordinated through Facebook, Twitter and BlackBerry Messenger. At the time U.K. prime minister David Cameron suggested closing down these services during times of civil unrest might be an option. It is an idea that appears to have public support, according to ZDNet. Security firm Unisys surveyed 973 adults. 70 percent of all respondents, including those who “completely” agree or “somewhat” agree, that during outbreaks of civil unrest, social media sites — including BlackBerry services – should be temporarily shut down to prevent coordinated criminal activity. 46 percent agreed that governments should have ‘open access’ to data on social network users, to prevent organised and co-ordinated crime, with slightly less at 42 percent believing that sites like Facebook and Twitter should know more information about users’ before allowing them to join.  
  • Two-thirds of Brits support Facebook, Twitter shutdown in future riots

    Date: 09/11/2011
    Summary: Most Britons believe the web should be limited in times of civil unrest. But not everybody agrees; particularly the younger generation. More than two thirds of British adults support the shutdown of social media sites during periods of civil unrest, a poll has found. This could add fuel to the flames in the aftermath to this summer’s riots across England’s cities, amid comments made by prime minister David Cameron where he considered ‘turning off’ the UK web to quell ongoing civil disorder.  
  • Nearly Half Of Brits Support Social Network Blockade

    Date: 09/11/2011
    Shutting down social networks in the interest of public safety is OK, says the British public Nearly half of the British public would support the temporary shutdown of social networks during periods of civil unrest, according to a survey. The Unisys Security Index revealed that 48 percent of people believe that social networks and instant messaging services should be blocked to prevent co-ordinated criminal activity.  
  • 70% Brits Agree to Social Media Crackdown During Social Unrest

    Date: 09/11/2011
    Over two thirds of Britons agree that use of social media must be banned during times of social unrest within the country. According to a poll conducted by internet security firm Unisys, 70 percent of the 973 polled by the company agreed that the use of social media services like Twitter, Facebook and BlackBerry Messenger must be banned during social unrest, like the riots which took place in England recently. Only 27 percent of the people that took part in the poll claimed that access to such websites should not be stopped.  
  • Half of UK public back shut down of social networking sites during riots

    Date: 09/11/2011
    Almost half of the UK public support the shutdown of social networks during periods of civil unrest and disorder, according to new research. The survey comes after widespread rioting in cities across England in August  this year. Following the unrest Prime Minster David Cameron directly linked the England riots to social networks. Although this was a move that was heavily criticised by free speech groups, the latest poll of 973 adults carried out by security firm Unisys found that 48 per cent of people would support a social network shutdown.  
  • Half of the UK supports social network shutdowns

    Date: 09/11/2011
    HALF OF THE UK would support a social networking shutdown during a period of social unrest like the recent rioting in London and across the country. Technology firm Unisys supplies us with the survey results, and yes it does do some work in security. It found that a sizable 48 per cent of the population that was prepared to answer a survey would support the temporary shutdown of social networks, like Twitter and Facebook, during periods of social unrest. Of course, we don't know what would qualify as "social unrest".  
  • #Riots – would you support a social network blackout?

    Date: 09/11/2011
    Should social networks, like Twitter and Facebook, suffer blackouts to stem the spread of civil unrest? A recent survey suggests that, following the riots, the idea is more popular than you might have thought. As riots spread across London and other major UK cities earlier this year, fingers were firmly pointed at Twitter, Facebook and Blackberry messaging for having a hand in their escalation. At the time, Which? Tech’s Andy Vandervell argued that we should steer clear from over hyping the role of social networks. They’re a powerful way to amplify any message, but they weren’t the reason the riots started, he reasoned. But although that might be true, perhaps they accelerated the speed with which they spread, as Richard commented: ‘The difference between staging riots and revolutions before the era of electronic communications is simply the speed of reaction. It was shown that it takes around an hour to react to electronic communication. Before it would take weeks or months to pass the word.’ So, if switching off these services would help slow riots running out of control, could we justify this type of action?  
  • Half of UK support Twitter shut-down to stop rioters

    Date: 09/11/2011
    A new survey shows half of the UK's population would support shutting down social media - Twitter, Blackberry Messaging and Facebook - during rioting. Recent civil unrest in UK cities and the loss of customer data in high profile security breaches have hardened public attitudes towards data protection. Based on findings from the recent bi-annual global Unisys Security Index, nearly half of U.K. respondents said that during outbreaks of civil unrest, providers of social networking and instant messaging services should temporarily shut down their networks to prevent coordinated criminal activity. A similar proportion accepts that the authorities should be able to access data from social networks if it helps improve public safety.
  • Two-thirds support social networking blackout in future riots

    Date: 08/11/2011
    More than two-thirds of adults support the shutdown of social networks during periods of social unrest such as the riots in England this summer, new research has revealed. A poll of 973 adults carried out for the online security firm Unisys found 70% of adults supported the shutdown of Twitter, Facebook and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM), while only 27% disagreed. Three-quarters agreed that governments should have open access to data on social network users in order to prevent co-ordinated crime. Support for action against social networks was strongest among over-65s and weakest among 18 to 24-year-olds, who are the heaviest users of the online services.  
  • Brits Back Twitter, Facebook Shutdown During Civil Unrest

    Date: 08/11/2011
    British Prime Minister David Cameron made astartling comment in the aftermath of the London riots last August: the government might temporarily shut down social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook to stop rioters organizing themselves again. Cue widespread condemnation from freedom of information advocates and the digerati across Twitter, and a comment through gritted teeth from the social network that “we are happy to listen.” Surprisingly, it appears nearly half the U.K. public fully back what Cameron was suggesting. A new survey from security firm Unisys shows that 48% of British respondents “completely agree” that during outbreaks of unrest, “providers should temporarily shut down social networks to prevent coordinated criminal activity.” In fact, the number goes higher — to 70% of all respondents — if you include the people who “agree somewhat” with the above statement.  
  • UK citizens support closure of Facebook and Twitter during riots

    Date: 08/11/2011
    Nearly half of UK citizens support the shutdown of social sites like Facebook or Twitter if civil unrest similar to the July riots were to happen again, according to new research. Unisys polled 973 adults in the UK and found that 48 per cent would back temporary blocks on social networks to prevent the medium being used to co-ordinate criminal activity. A similar number of those surveyed, 46 per cent, said that authorities should be able to access data from social networks if it improves public safety.
  • Theresa May wants to boot troublemakers from social media

    Date: 08/11/2011
    The Home Secretary has revealed that troublemakers could be banned from social media following meetings with Facebook, Twitter and others. Fielding question on how to tackle gang culture, Home Sec Theresa May highlighted ongoing discussions with representatives of the social media sites and BlackBerry.  Meetings also included the Association of Chief Police Offices and the Metropolitan Police, with regular contact kept up since the summer's JD Sports free-for-all. Taking down social networks completely was unrealistic and shortsighted. It seems the government is now considering a more targeted approach.
  • Survey shows significant adult backing for social networking blackout in future riots

    Date: 08/11/2011
    New research reveals that the majority of adults believe that the shutdown of social media services such as Twitter and Facebook would stem the spread of unrest in any future UK riots. The Guardian reports today that a poll of 973 adults carried out for the online security firm, Unisys, found 70% of adults supported the shutdown of Twitter, Facebook and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) - with only 27% disagreeing. Three-quarters agreed that governments should have open access to data on social network users in order to prevent co-ordinated crime.  
  • What are you afraid of?

    Date: 09/05/2011
    The recently published Unisys Security Index reveals that UK public insecurity is now at its peak since the study started measuring consumer security concerns in 2007. The country's national, financial, internet and personal security concerns have all reached new heights, indicating that the changing financial, political and defence landscapes have taken their toll. The Index tracks consumer security concerns every six months and yields insights into the security issues that matter to people. Based on new research conducted in February 2011, UK consumer security concern has jumped 42 points in just six months to an index score of 154, representing a serious level of concern. The Index is measured on a scale of 0 to 300.
  • Card fraud is number one security worry for Brits

    Date: 09/05/2011
    In the latest Unisys Security Index, which saw 953 people from the UK quizzed, 93% of respondents say they are worried about bank card fraud. This fear appears fairly well justified considering that there were over 102,500 cases of bank card fraud identified in 2010, according to Cifas, with many more instances not reported.The next biggest concern is ID theft, cited by 91%, compared to 85% for terrorism. Nearly two thirds believe that large gatherings at events such as the Royal Wedding and the Olympics, are targets for malicious attack with 74% worried about airports and planes.Overall, the index shows Brits have become considerably more concerned about their security over the last six months, with their score rising 42 points to 154 on a scale of zero to 300.
  • Banking fraud now number one concern for UK consumers

    Date: 06/05/2011
    This is the fourth bi-annual index of its type from the IT services firm, but the report shows that bank security concerns have soared in the last year, with 92% of respondents saying they were worried about bank card fraud, and 91% saying ID theft was also a major concern. Citing figures from CIFAS, the UK's fraud prevention service, the study notes that 102,500 cases of bank card fraud were identified in 2010, with many more cases not being reported. Interestingly, researchers found that people had conflicting feelings about WikiLeaks and the right to reveal secret information.
  • Public security concerns reach new peak

    Date: 06/05/2011
      UK public security worries reach four-year peak, according to Unisys Security Index. Nearly two-thirds (63 per cent) of the UK public believes that large gatherings, like the Olympics, are targets for malicious attack. Bank card fraud is the number one concern with 93 per cent of UK respondents worried about this issue. Security concerns at their highest levels across the board since Unisys survey started in 2007  
  • Bank fraud top security concern for UK consumers

    Date: 05/05/2011
    Bank fraud is the top concern for UK consumers, beating out malicious attacks at large gatherings, such as the Olympics, and concerns over terrorist attacks on aeroplanes. The Unisys Security Index showed that security concerns are at the highest levels across the board since the surveys begun in 2007. Bank card fraud is high on the minds of 93 per cent of UK respondents, who worry about this issue, followed closely by identity theft at 91 per cent. Two-thirds (63 per cent) are concerned about large gatherings being targets for malicious attack, and 74 per cent believe airports and aeroplanes are vulnerable. The Index tracks consumer security concerns every six months, and this research, conducted in February 2011, shows that the UK consumer’s security concern has jumped 42 points to an index score of 154, representing a serious level of concern – a leap in just six months.
  • Card fraud is Britain's top security concern

    Date: 05/05/2011
    If you've ever been a victim of identity fraud, you'll know what an invasion of privacy it is and the complete hassle it is to sort out if someone has been spending your money on the other side of the world. In fact bank card fraud is the number one concern among Britons' today, followed by fears of identity theft. Britons' worries about security have escalated to a four-year high, a new survey has revealed, with concerns about banking fraud, identity theft and safety relating to terrorism topping the list.
  • Bank card fraud is UK consumers' number one security concern

    Date: 05/05/2011
    Banking fraud is the number one concern for UK consumers, according to the latest Security Index from IT services firm Unisys. The firm has being taking the pulse of the public for four years now and reckons that security concerns have reached new heights, jumping a whopping 42 points in just six months. Some 93 per cent of respondents said they were worried about bank card fraud and 91 per cent said ID theft was their main fear. The stats highlight that despite the banking industry's efforts to arm its customers with two factor authentication devices to improve security, fears persist. Yet these fears may not be entirely justified, with the latest figures from the UK Cards Association and Financial Fraud Action UK in March showing online banking fraud losses totalling £46.7m in 2010, a 22 per cent fall on the 2009 figure of £59.7m.
  • Bank Card Fraud “Our #1 Security Concern”

    Date: 05/05/2011
    The Guardian has reported the results of a survey which suggests that the UK’s security concerns are at a four-year high, and that bank card fraud is number 1 on the list of worries. The data, which dates back to February of this year, before the recent events bought terrorism back into the headlines, suggests that 93% of us are worried about our bank cards being scammed, closely followed by identity fraud, worrying 91% of us. The survey also also shows that the number of people seriously concerned about meeting their financial obligations has doubled in six months.
  • Bank card fraud is Britons' No 1 security concern, says survey

    Date: 04/05/2011
    Britons' worries about security have escalated to a four-year high, a new survey has revealed, with concerns about banking fraud, identity theft and safety relating to terrorism topping the list. Bank card fraud is the number one concern with 93% of UK respondents worried about the issue, closely followed by identify theft which worried 92% of them.
  • Fear of flying

    Date: 04/05/2011
    Seventy-four percent of UK citizens believe that airports and aeroplanes are vulnerable to a malicious or terrorist attack. So finds the latest Unisys Security Index*, announced today, a global survey that seeks to provide insights into consumers’ general perception of security. Unisys says that UK public anxiety has reached its peak since they began the bi-annual review in 2007, and it is driven by concerns about terrorism, financial issues and identity theft. According to counter-terrorism expert Neil Fisher, vice president of Global Security Solutions at Unisys, the public are right to be concerned and knee-jerk approaches to security aren’t working.
  • Fake bomb highlights concerns 

    Date: 01/04/2011
    The issue of cargo security has been raised again following the late detection of a fake bomb on a cargo plane. An investigation is currently under way into how the suspicious device travelled to Turkey without being detected. A UPS flight travelled to Istanbul with the package, reportedly containing a timer, wires and a detonator. The UK Department for Transport said it was taking the matter "very seriously". 
  • EU committee warns against use of body scanners 

    Date: 18/02/2011
    The European Commission is too focused on using body scanners in airports, and is ignoring potential issues around human rights and health risks, according to a group of politicians

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